When even tiny legislative decisions can affect millions of lives in the developing world, it's crucial that we know what we're talking about.

Test your knowledge about food aid and the U.S. Farm Bill, the key piece of legislation that determines our international food aid policies, and see if you can see a smarter way to save lives.

Once you've answered the questions, share the quiz with your friends on Facebook and Twitter!

What is the U.S. Farm Bill?

A guidebook for effective farming in the U.S.
The federal government's primary legislation that determines our domestic and international policies on agriculture and food.The federal government's primary legislation that determines our domestic and international policies on agriculture and food.

The Farm Bill is passed every five to seven years by Congress and dictates federal policies concerning a wide range of food and agriculture issues, such as farm subsidies, agricultural research, domestic nutrition programs and international food aid.
Permission for the federal government to investigate U.S. farms without a warrant in order to ensure food safety.
Tax subsidies for buying produce in farmers' markets.

True or False: U.S. international food aid policy gets food in the hands of the greatest number of hungry people as possible.

True
False Burdensome regulations cause on average one-third of each dollar America spends on food aid to be wasted, for example on shipping, which means fewer people who are hungry get the food they need.

True or False: U.S. international food aid policy gets food to hungry people quickly and efficiently by helping farmers who live near affected areas to meet the food needs of their fellow citizens.

True
False In 2010, just over 15 percent of the entire food aid budget was designated for local and regional purchase of food aid supplies in developing countries.

If the U.S. purchased food aid supplies near countries where hungry people live, rather than in the U.S. itself, we could feed ________.

25 million more hungry people The bulk of the food delivered to aid recipients, which is covered by the Farm Bill’s food aid programs, is still required to be supplied by U.S. agribusiness firms and food processors. Other large donors like the European Union have "untied" their food aid or lowered requirements for food to come directly from the donor country -- and are, as a result, able to help more hungry people.
10 million more hungry people
5 million more hungry people
the same amount of hungry people

U.S. law requires that a large proportion of U.S. food aid MUST be transported on U.S. ships. In 1985, the requirement that 50% of that cargo be transported on U.S. ships was increased to ________.

55%
65%
75% These so-called "cargo preference" requirements continue to be an enormous burden that slow the pace of aid and drive up costs. With limited competitive bidding on shipping prices, a larger percentage of the food aid budget goes to shipping than is necessary and it often means longer shipping routes. If this requirement were eliminated, an estimated 2 to 3 million more hungry people could be fed.
100%

U.S. food aid policy is in desperate need of reform.

True The desperation is in the faces of hungry people in developing countries around the world. By adopting three simple reforms to the upcoming Farm Bill, Congress could turn the U.S. food aid program into an efficient, cost-effective model to providing hungry people the resources they need to feed their families, contribute to their local economies and ultimately sustain their own communities.
False